Kate Camp won the 2011 New Zealand Book Award for The Mirror Of Simple Annihilated Souls (published by Victoria University Press), which relates to The Mirror Of Simple Souls by the late 13th and early 14th-century French mystic Marguerite Porète. She was also chosen for the Creative New Zealand Berlin Writers' Residency, starting in September 2011. Out of which came her latest book Snow White's Coffin (2013), also done by VUP.

Peter Reading's last book was Vendange Tardive (2010) published by Bloodaxe. Not the first of his long list of collections to have a foreign title, perhaps a curt Latin one, or go by just a number, a degree of frost. Within his harsh often depressive tone there was a great deal of control, and beauty too. He was a gloomy heartfelt birdwatcher, and died in November 2011.

Les Murray's latest book of poetry Waiting For The Past (2015) was published by Black Inc. He lives in New South Wales and his many compelling collections are of work not at all like anyone else's.

Hinemoana Baker's three collections of poetry are published by Victoria University Press, including her latest waha/mouth (2014). She is a graduate of that university's Institute of Modern Letters, and works as an editor, a teacher of creative writing and a brief intervention smoking cessation telephone counsellor.

Jaswinder Bolina is the author of Phantom Camera, winner of the 2012 Green Rose Prize in Poetry from New Issues Press, and Carrier Wave - nice title - winner of the 2006 Colorado Prize for Poetry.

Brian Waltham, whose poetic career began in the last quarter of his life, after retirement from practising as a marine lawyer, died soon after the publication by Peterloo of his third collection. A passionate, droll and prolific writer, he left many remarkable unpublished poems behind in his study, including these four, written in the course of his last few years. The Hang Of It, a posthumous collection (not including these poems), was published in 2011 by Line Press.

Harry Clifton is a leading Irish poet, and was The Ireland Professor of Poetry 2010-2012. His latest book is The Winter Sleep Of Captain Lemass, published by Bloodaxe in 2012. In addition Bloodaxe has brought out his Selected Poems 1974-2004, The Holding Centre (2014). He lives in Dublin.

Matthew Olzmann's first book of poems, Mezzanines, was selected for the Kundiman Prize. He's American and has had poems and essays in Kenyon Review, Brevity, New England Review, Poetry Northwest, Gulf Coast, The Southern Review, Waxwing and elsewhere. His second book of poetry, Contradictions In The Design (2016), was also published by Alice James Books.

Patrick Brandon is a visual artist too. His first book of poems A Republic Of Linen was published by Bloodaxe in 2009. In 2005 he won the Essex Poetry Prize. His poems have appeared in the Bloodaxe anthology Identity Parade in 2010, and Best British Poetry 2013 (Salt), as well as Poetry London. He lives in Bristol.

Roc Sandford's A Walk In The Graveyard is not offered here as a 'prose poem', but it is poetic prose in the best sense, poetic par excellence, and included in Qualm by virtue of that. Roc Sandford, who is part English, part Scottish, part Irish, is also the author of the novel Canal Wood: A Flora, and a fishfarm-fighting ecologist and writer on ecological and political issues.

Tusiata Avia, a New Zealander of Samoan and Palagi descent, has published two books of poetry, Wild Dogs Under My Skirt (2004) and Bloodclot (2009), both with Victoria University Press, and two children’s books. Known for her dynamic performance style, she has also written and performed a one-woman show called, like the collection, Wild Dogs Under My Skirt, which toured internationally from 2002-2008. Tusiata was the recipient of the 2013 Janet Frame Literary Trust Award.

Ian Duhig's book Pandorama came out in November 2010. He sent Qualm these two poems among others shortly afterwards. They had appeared in the book but as they'd never, he said, been placed anywhere else, and the book was not long out, they were included in Qualm as an irresistible exception. His latest book is The Blind Roadmaker (2016), also from Picador.

Malachi Smyth has always written poetry and songs, but he is primarily a scriptwriter, with often a number of filmscripts under option. He sometimes describes himself as 'poised on several fronts'.

Cody Walker is the author of Shuffle and Breakdown (2008) and The Self-Styled No-Child (2016), both published by Waywiser Press. He's been in The Best American Poetry, The Hecht Prize Anthology, Slate, Parnassus, Salon, and The Yale Review. He lives with his family in Ann Arbor, where he teaches at the University of Michigan.

Jack Beeching, an English poet prominent in the third quarter of the twentieth century, thereafter fell into neglect despite continuing until his death to write poetry - moving, original, clear-sighted, compressed, funny - which remained stronger perhaps, more trenchant, than that of almost any of his contemporaries still writing. His neglect was partly attributable to his having to live, because of a busted lung, the second half of his life in the drier abroad - a life, in tiny apartments, of near-poverty and throwback dedication (and erudition). These poems are drawn from the privately printed (Art Ojo Nuevo) Poems 1940-2000 he brought out near the end of his life (a book which achieved only a tiny circulation).

John Whitworth is, in his own words, 'one of those fattish, baldish, oldish, backward-looking, provincial poets in which England is so rich'. Actually he's one of a kind. Les Murray has called him 'Kent’s rococo rhymer and hyperbolist'. He started out with Secker and Warburg, and was then for many years with Peterloo. His tenth collection, Girlie Gangs, was published by Enitharmon in 2012.

The Canadian Bert Almon's tenth book of poems, Waiting for the Gulf Stream, was published by Hagios Press in 2010.

Simon Carnell’s prose book Hare was published in 2010 by Reaktion. His poems have appeared in London Review of Books, Times Literary Supplement, Poetry Review, Metre, Harvard Review, Oxford Poetry, The Spectator and elsewhere. His translations and co-translations from the Italian have been published in, amongst other places, The Faber Book of Twentieth Century Italian Poems. He is currently completing a first full volume of poems, Lit.

Hugo Williams's eleventh collection I Knew The Bride (2014) is published by Faber. He writes a column for the TLS.

Hannah Baker Saltmarsh teaches at Dillard University in New Orleans and has published in the TLS, New Republic, Gulf Coast, Denver Quarterly, Antioch Review ... She is American but did her PhD in English at York University.

Jamie McKendrick was at first with OUP, then moved to Faber, who published his most recent collection Out There in 2012. For which he won the Hawthornden Prize. He is also a notable translator, and translated both Giorgio Bassani's The Garden Of The Finzi-Continis and Bassani's short story collection The Smell Of Hay for Penguin. Faber has this year brought out his Selected Poems.



Links
poetrylibrary.org.uk
poetryireland.ie
Formafluens.net